How to read a call sheet!

So in this article I am going to explain some basics on how to read a call sheet. The following are things to look at on the callsheet.call sheet

1. You want to look at the time on the callsheet. It is located in the middle of the sheet and it is the biggest Font on the call sheet. That is the time that you are to report to work, hence the title callsheet. This sheet is usually given the day or night before each day of work.

2. It also has the name of the production you are working on. This can be helpful to know as there are signs posted on the road to find the location to the set usually (but not always) with the production’s name.

3. The next thing to look at is the list of scenes that you will be shooting that day. Next to it is usually the page count listed in 8ths on the right of each scene, then you will find the total page count listed to shoot at the bottom of this section. This section will also have a list of which day in the script the scene falls on, shown as D1 D2 and N1. Just prior to each scene is usually int or ext., which means interior or exterior respectively, and then the location of the scene. As well as a line that is called a slug line or oneliner which describes the scene.

4. Another thing to look at is the cast list and all the actors that will be working and their call times.

5. Under the cast list is the list of props that are needed for the day.

6. At the top of the page usually to the left is a list of the producers and director as well as the ADs and a number to call if you have questions or get lost.

7. On the back of the call sheet is a list of the crew working that day and their different departments. This way you can refer to the crew by their names if you forget them and also sometimes it has individual call times. You may want to check your name and call time.
There are other things on the call sheet but this is a brief overview to get you started.

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